Feedback on 6/17/14 Issue of “Work Is Not for Sissies!”

Advertisements

3 Responses to “Feedback on 6/17/14 Issue of “Work Is Not for Sissies!””

  1. Russ Ramey Says:

    In March of 2009 when the Obama bottom fell out, my company laid me off. We saw the numbers and it was inevitable. But I was determined not to let this kill my attitude. I got my license and went into insurance which is brutal for cold calling, rejections, doing face-to-face and group presentations. After four years of running 30,000 miles a year in insurance yet doing well; my old company offered to bring me back in better circumstances than when I left. Eventually I went back to work. But I had learned a lot about who I was and who I wasn’t. Work is NOT for sissies, whether you work for yourself or someone else. Do NOT wait for opportunities to drop on you. Go find them…Carpae Diem!

  2. Scott Says:

    Whenever I’ve been hungry and prayed for something to eat, God has not ever just dropped a hotdog into my lap. But, when I’ve been hungry, and LOOKED for a hotdog, damned if didn’t ALWAYS find one.

    Doing the footwork to obtain any goal is absolutely essential. I believe that the statistics for job hunting is that it takes approx. 20 applications to get 1 interview and 4 to 5 interviews to get an offer of employment. Earnestly looking for employment is indeed a “Full Time Job”, if doing it correctly.

    In 1996, I was “RIF’d” (reduction in force) as the business management team of our non-profit agency was careless with allowing a number of poor (expensive, non productive) clinical decisions to go forward.

    My ego was crushed, as I witnessed the very people that put us into this crisis situation being retained. After a few weeks, I too was asked to come back to work there again. I declined, and found my “dream job” within a few weeks.

    The lesson for me was that once again, something that seemed a tragedy, was in fact, a blessing. Being RIF’d forced me into getting off of my comfortable tush and search for my “dream job”, which, by the way, I still have after 20 years.

  3. Michael Duesterbeck Says:

    I was fired from my job as a Chef at a Local Country Club.I was 65 yrs. old, and some would have relegated me to an early retirement. One week after I was let go, my job was posted on the Country Club HR Help wanted page. I was devastated and all my friends said I should pursue Age discrimination charges.
    “What did I do?” I sent every person at our Club whom I had worked for, including the Owner and his wife, a note. I thanked them for the opportunity to have worked at such a Lovely Place and wished them luck in the new season.
    Then I woke every morning, got dressed for success,and went to a job I did`nt have yet. I spent 8 days drinking coffee at Starbucks,and every other coffee shop where the elite would meet.
    I made my job search public to anyone who would listen. Then one day a man in the Coffee shop asked me to interview for a local Church Camp Job.
    Not my first choice but it was a job. Now four years later I am working at the same Camp for the nicest people in the World. They are grateful for all I do and say so everyday.I feel like a valued employee.
    At the same time I started a Black Car service to and from Chicago,priced myself as an elite service and refused to discount down to my competitors.
    Today I own 3 luxury vehicles which are in use every day.I am utilized because I am the most dependable and have the best vehicles. Many customers book me on the spot because of my phone manners and the fact that I return their calls. Most clients say that my competitors don`t even answer a voicemail.
    All in all, getting fired was devastating, but the best thing that ever happened to me.My advice would be to hold no grudges or to act vindictive.Too many negative vibes wasted there.Instead go forth positively and be the Employee your Boss can not live without.
    And yes, an earlier seminar I attended with Glenn had a huge impact on my life.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s


%d bloggers like this: